Condos in Kauai

kauai

25 Jun

Why Kauai is an unrivaled destination

The island of Kauai is located about 20 minutes away via cheap flights from Honolulu. It is the fourth largest of the Hawaiian Islands and is also the oldest at six million years old. It was formed as the Pacific plate slid over the Hawaii hotspot, and the island is certainly volcanic in its origins. This fiery birth resulted in the incredibly rich soil and lush growth of trees and plants that now cover the island; hence the name Kauai, its title as the “Garden Isle”. A small island, covering approximately 550 square miles, Kauai can easily be traversed within four hours.

Kauai maintains a comfortable average temperature of 78° F and the ocean waters surrounding the island hover between 74°F and 80°F. Kauai is also very rainy; one of the wettest places on earth is located here on the east side of Mount Wai’ale’ale, with an average annual rainfall of 460 inches. The huge amount of precipitation feeds the many scenic waterfalls, and it also carved out the deep valleys and canyons of the island that make Kauai so spectacular.

Kauai history and facts

The first European to set foot on Kauai was Captain James Cook who sailed into Waimea Bay in 1778, and named the location for the Earl of Sandwich, his patron.

Along with the neighboring island of Niihau, Kauai was the last of the Hawaiian Islands to become a part of the Kingdom of Hawaii under King Kamehameha in 1824.

Beginning in 1835, the sugar industry became the dominant force in the Hawaiian economy, with the first sugar mill being established in Old Koloa Town in the same year. Sugar remained a booming industry there for more than a century, but today many of the plantation lands have been converted for ranching. The last remaining sugar plant is currently transitioning to sugar-ethanol production.

The volcanic soil and heavy precipitation result in Kauai having exceptionally fertile land. In addition to sugarcane, coffee and many varieties of fruit, including banana, guava, mango, papaya and pineapple are also cultivated.

Kauai is home to thousands of wild roosters and chickens. Descended from Polynesian and European chickens, they roam freely with few natural predators. Kauai is also home to a large population of stray cats that have had a detrimental effect on the native wildlife, particularly the birds.

Must-see tourist attractions in Kauai

Waimea Canyon, located within Waimea Canyon State Park, is one of the most familiar locations in Kauai due to its frequent appearances on film and television; one of its most famous appearances was during the flight to the island in Jurassic Park. “The Grand Canyon of the Pacific” is the largest canyon in the Pacific and one of the most scenic. Surrounding it is Kokee State Park, a more than 4,000-acre expanse of Koa hardwoods and Norfolk pines, as well as native plants and wildlife.

Visitors looking for an active itinerary in Kauai will enjoy the kayaking and coastal hiking trails along the Na Pali Coast.

The Holo Holo Koloa Scenic Byway is a 19-mile stretch that connects many of the historical and cultural sites on the island, such as Malhuia Road, also known as the Tree Tunnel due to the canopy of eucalyptus trees lining it; and the Spouting Horn, a blowhole rock formation that spouts seawater plumes into the air.

Author: Aimee Claire
Spouting Horn Kauai

No comments yet

Leave a Reply